color theory: in the weeds with the details

Okay, we are jumpin’ into the weeds folks.

 

Last post I went over

  • Analyzing your space; the good, the bad, and the ugly, so we could put your inspiration piece to work.
  • Analyzing the piece to find contrasting colors, harmonious colors and neutral colors.
  • Using a contrasting color scheme to draw your eye to the focal point in the space.
  • Adding other colors to interact in supporting roles and backdrop colors.
  • The use of repetition of colors to get a cohesive and lively result.

Now were going a bit deeper into analyzing the supporting colors and repetition of the colors that we got from my inspiration piece, the Pillow. When repeating the colors we want to watch out for “match- matchy”.  Match-matchy is a designer term; referring to an uninteresting combination that is to be avoided if possible.  Look at high end shelter magazines, such as House Beautiful, Veranda, Architecture Digest etc., they don’t have overly match-matchy themes going on. Where the drapes, bedding, chair, all are the same fabric and the furniture is all from the same line or materials. Why don’t they want it all the same? Because it’s boring, life is too short to be boring.

 

Neutral walls and curtains

The wall color is a light neutral (Almond Wisp by Behr) that allows other colors to show off against it.

almond-wisp-by-behr
guest room wall color

The same goes for the trim, ceiling, drop cloth curtains & bed skirt and the faux grass rug. Remember the brighter and more contrasting colors are on the focal point (the bed). As you look around the room hits of duller, darker or softer versions of those colors are repeated. I found some neutral pillows for the bed to reinforce the connection with the neutrals in the inspiration pillow and the wall color.

guest-room-color-theory
bright bedding with neutral pillows like wall color
Need some inspiration and advice for your guest room project, part 1 of our guest room series. In this series we will give a breakdown of steps to help you to decorate your guest room in any style or color. #darkgreenpaint#chalkpaintdiy#mountainpinepaint
guest room: neutral walls, behr’s almond wisp

I wanted address the balance problem with the windows. The problem with the room is the placement doesn’t allow for symmetrical bed placement. (The windows are not symmetrical outside either, really mister architect what the????)  The color of the drop cloth curtain is so close to the wall color, it down plays the poor placement of the windows. The effect on the view is that, it maximizes your attention on the colors of the focal point and minimizes the less important features, like the asymmetrical window placement.

 

 

Quilt hanger and hat rack with orangey-red

Need some inspiration and advice for your guest room project, part 1 of our guest room series. In this series we will give a breakdown of steps to help you to decorate your guest room in any style or color. #hatrack#quilthanger
antique hat rack and new quilt hanger

The duvet cover is hanging from a quit hanger. The hanger is medium to dark stained wood with the same off white as the door and the trim. The quilt acts like a piece of functional art; it is dark orangey-red and tan in a field of off white.  And the hat rack above is dark stain with lettering almost the same as the quilt. The similar colors help to unify the random items to make it work together and not have to be disconnected even though they are not one object. The darker orangey red color is repeated all over the room in the vase, the vintage books and a clock beside the floral duvet and hat rack.

hat-rack-& quilt
hat rack and duvet
Need some inspiration and advice for your guest room project, part 1 of our guest room series. In this series we will give a breakdown of steps to help you to decorate your guest room in any style or color. #hatrack#thenuthouseco.#guestroom
“the ornaments of a house are the friends that frequent it” hat rack at the nut house

 

 

The dresser and mirrors forest green

dark stained top
Dark stained top, dark green gray chalk paint, white dry brushed details, clear and dark wax
mirror-and-dresser
Mirror and dresser painted same color

The dresser and nightstand‘s forest green play nice with the turquoise. The green has a lot of gray and doesn’t scream look at me too much. Surprisingly, I did paint the mirrors to match the dresser, even though that does fall into the “matchy-matchy” arena. By making them the same color, I was trying to make them part of the dresser so they won’t feel as lost, because of their size. They were something left behind by the previous homeowner and they look so small and underwhelming, to me, that I’m not 100% happy with the mirrors. I figured I can either find replacements or create a back ground that will visually combine them together. Something I can play with later.

 

Black

Two of the walls have window curtains with black rods placed as close to the top as possible. These hits of black draw your eye upwards because of the contrast to the wall and curtain color. Remember, one of the best things about the room was how tall the ceilings are so I wanted to highlight that. Black hooks are used to hang the hat rack; also drawing your eye up.

curtain-rod-black
black curtain rod

 

A little ceiling fan rant. I don’t care what some fantastic designer says about ceiling fans. If you don’t have central air you need fans and not all of us want or need crystal chandeliers.

The ceiling fan, I chose, is not overly large and it is dark brown and black in color. If the ceiling were lower I might have painted it to blend better with the ceiling.

black-headboard
black headboard

It’s usually best to repeat a color at least 3 times to make it feel intentional and remember the bed is the focal point. You can see the head board is black. I needed to repeat the black again and thought:  I’ll just double down on that and make a strong contrast to the light walls. Now with bright contrasting bedding and the contrasting wall/headboard combo we have two design features working to say; look at me, the bed.

We are going to go over the dark brown, brass, artwork and tchotchkes next post. I feel like I am overloading you with too many details for this one post so, I’ll split it here.  Maybe I’m milking it. 😉

Creative needs opportunity so do something nutty this week.

 

color-theory-detailslorin

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6 thoughts on “color theory: in the weeds with the details

    1. Laurie thanks for dropping by. It’s easier to buy everything the same because that’s how it is marketed to buyers. By not buying everything matching you can replace the couch and not your whole living room set. It doesn’t have to match together. 😉

      Liked by 1 person

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